2916 Minnesota Avenue, Stevens Point, WI 54481

Monday-Friday 8am-5pm | Closed Saturday and Sunday

FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

D&D Automotive Services Expertise

Q. How often should I rotate my tires?

Every 6,000 miles or every other oil change.

Q. Is it really necessary to replace my timing belt at the recommended interval?

YES. The failure of a timing belt in many cars can result in major engine damage. The cost of repairing an engine with a broken timing belt is much greater than the cost of a timing belt replacement.

Q. What does it mean if my “check engine” or “service engine soon” light comes on?

There are many sensors and computerized components that manage your vehicle’s engine performance and emissions. When one of these fails, the “check engine” light is illuminated. Although your car may seem to run fine, it is important to have the issue addressed to prevent long-term problems.

Q. What should I do if my car starts to overheat?

This is a very serious problem – if your car overheats for too long, you can damage your engine. As soon as possible, find a safe place to pull off the road and shut the engine off! Do not attempt to check the fluid level in the radiator as it can burn you. The best thing to do is have your car towed to D & D Automotive.

Q. When should I get my oil changed?

You should get your oil changed every 5,000 miles or as recommended in your vehicle’s owner’s manual.

Q. How to make sure my car battery has a good electrical connection?

Battery cables and terminals should inspected at every oil change service and cleaned and sealed whenever necessary to make sure they provide a good electrical connection.

Q. What is synthetic motor oil?

Synthetic motor oils can be a good choice for high output, turbocharged or supercharged engines, vehicles that are used for towing (especially during hot weather), or vehicles that are operated in extremely cold or hot climates. Synthetic motor oils, though more expensive than mineral-based motor oils, can improve fuel economy and provide longer intervals between changes.

Q. When should I replace my car’s fuel filter?

To help ensure dependable, trouble-free performance, replace your car’s fuel filter approximately every 20,000 miles or once a year.

Q. When should I change my spark plugs?

They should be changed when the spark plug’s gap exceeds the manufacturer’s specification or as recommended in the vehicle’s owner’s manual.

Q. I need to replace a burned out fuse, what should I do?

Always replace burned-out fuses with ones of the same amperage (printed on the fuse) and note that if a fuse continues to “blow,” you should have the circuit checked professionally by one of our technicians for shorts.

Q. Do performance modifications made to my vehicle void the factory warranty?

Whether you’re shopping for a replacement exhaust system or in the market for an aftermarket cold air intake—and you’re worried about your vehicle’s warranty—have no fear. AutoAnything is here to give you the 4-1-1 on the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, which protects consumers from being wrongfully denied warranty coverage when they customize their rides.
If you’re an auto enthusiast, chances are, you’ve heard the myth that modding your ride with aftermarket accessories automatically cancels your warranty. While this may be true in certain circumstances, you shouldn’t take this as an absolute. According to the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, a vehicle manufacturer cannot void the warranty of your vehicle due to an aftermarket part unless they can prove that the aftermarket part was the cause of or contributed to the failure of the vehicle (15 U.S.C. 2302 (C)). This means that a vehicle’s warranty cannot be “voided;” the dealer can only deny a claim if the stock part failed due to damage or unreasonable use.

Summary
When accessorizing your vehicle with aftermarket parts, your warranty claim cannot be automatically denied, nor can your warranty be voided, if you install non-OEM parts in your vehicle. The burden is on the dealer to prove the aftermarket parts caused the failure. For example, if your windshield wiper motors fail, your vehicle’s warranty claim can’t be denied because you installed aftermarket windshield wipers that are different from OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer) parts. Similarly, if a wheel bearing fails or a fan belt snaps and you have an aftermarket exhaust installed, the dealership would have to prove the exhaust system caused the bearing failure or the belt to snap in order to deny a warranty claim. In these types of scenarios, the dealership should have no reason to deny your claims.
In addition to the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act, you also have SEMA (Specialty Equipment Market Association) working to protect your rights. Because SEMA represents U.S. aftermarket wholesalers, retailers, distributors and manufacturers, they often keep car manufacturers in check by supporting legislation that prevents dealership service providers from denying warranty coverage. This means dealerships have become less stringent when it comes to aftermarket parts that modify performance or suspension.